Shop – Fruit Trees for sale

Fruit trees for sale this year are listed in the fruit tree categories below....click on a fruit tree type to find the extensive list of varieties available. Fruit trees are dug out of the ground in May each year, and dispatched via mail order to you during June, July and August. Among our list of fruit trees this year you will find a mixture of modern and heritage fruit trees for sale, also including a list of dwarf fruit trees.

  • Ornamental Trees

    Ornamental Trees (3)

    Ornamental Trees are used as part of a garden or landscape setting, for instance for their flowers, their texture, form and shape, and other aesthetic characteristics. We supply a range Ornamental trees, small and large in size all with varying characteristics.
  • Raspberries

    Raspberries (4)

  • Dwarf Fruit Trees

    Dwarf Fruit Trees (33)

    Dwarf Fruit Tree varieties includes all types of dwarf fruit trees from our fruit tree catalogue....dwarf apricots are NEW, dwarf plum trees also NEW, dwarf quinces, dwarf cherries, dwarf apple trees, dwarf medlar trees, dwarf nectarine trees, and more
  • Apple trees

    Apple trees (18)

    Apple trees this year include a great many unusual and old-fashioned fruits (we have over 100 varieties in our orchard on the farm). We offer a selection of these in our catalogue each year, along with some of the best of our modern apples. Apple trees this year come grafted on MM106 rootstocks, a semi dwarfing rootstock which will grow to somewhere between 2.5 and 3.5 metres high, and are very easy to keep pruned lower than this if you want to. Dwarf apple trees are also offered this year, grafted onto M26 rootstocks, which give a two metre high tree - these are not listed here - you need to look in the dwarf apple trees section of the shop to find them. Some apple tree varieties are labelled ‘triploid’, meaning they do not have viable pollen to cross pollinate another tree, so don’t choose one of these with only one other variety, or the triploid will get pollinated, but the other variety won’t – you will need a third variety to do this. Why bother with triploid apples then? Because they represent some of the best apples we know.
  • Crab Apple Trees

    Crab Apple Trees (5)

    Crab apple trees are plants most often used for their wonderful ornamental value, but also esteemed for the crab apple jelly that can be made from their fruits, as well as being a handy addition to apple cider brews that need a bit of extra kick
  • Cider Apples

    Cider Apples (12)

    ***Orchard quantities of many cider varieties available*** ***CIDER APPLE DISCOUNTS - on large orders of cider apples, contact us for a quote*** Cider apples these days are used by blending a mixture of different apple varieties together. However in times past there were traditional varieties from which cider was pressed using one variety alone. The cider apples we offer were usually from particular regions of England and France, where each apple made a local drink with its own special qualities, allowing the natives to make their own unique brews from their own regional apples.
  • Pear Trees

    Pear Trees (21)

    Pear trees represent some of the finest varieties in our finest heritage fruit collection. Pears are grafted onto Calleryana D6 rootstocks, which yield a standard sized pear tree if trained as a vase or central leader tree. In our own orchard, we also grow our espaliered pears on these rootstocks, and while they require a bit more care to train and keep down low as an espalier, they are more hardy than the fully dwarf pears, and do better in more difficult soils and drought conditions.
  • Quinces

    Quinces (8)

    Quinces are a terrific little home garden tree, which are very hardy – will tolerate a wet soil, and also have some drought tolerance, making them a good tree for difficult areas. With a little bit of looking after (regular watering, pruning, fertilising) they will set a heavy crop of fruit, and when the fruit are ripening they send a very distinctive and tantalising aroma wafting around the garden, not to mention their very pretty ornamental flowers in Spring. Quinces are primarily used for making jams and jellies, but they are also dried and made into cider, they make a delicious paste (suitable for cheese platters), stewed with custard they’re a terrific desert….need I go on. Most of our quinces this year, (except Smyrna Large, and Champion Large), are offered on semi dwarfing rootstocks -they are grafted onto Quince A rootstocks, which yield a tree of about 2.5 - 3 metres height. They are very easy to keep pruned to a smaller size if desired, and will make a very good espalier as well. The Smyrna and Champion grow to larger trees - more like 3-4 metres.
  • Cherry Trees

    Cherry Trees (11)

    Cherry trees are fast becoming one of our most popular fruit types. They are certainly one of the most luscious of all fruits to grow for yourself - a very rewarding fruit tree to grow
  • Sour Cherry Trees

    Sour Cherry Trees (2)

    Sour cherry trees are grown for culinary purposes, and are highly sought after for use in pies, preserves, sauces, jams, and even liquers
  • Apricot trees

    Apricot trees (15)

    Apricot trees this year are offered in a larger range than we've ever had. Plenty to choose from - whether you want apricots for bottling, drying, nectar, or eating fresh; apricot trees for cool climates, hot climates, frosty places...apricot trees for everyone!
  • Plum Trees - Japanese & Blood Plums

    Plum Trees - Japanese & Blood Plums (15)

    Plum trees in this category come from Asian origins, rather than European, and tend to be a little more sprightly and less fully sweet. Blood plums are amongst the most popular of all plum trees grown
  • Fruit Tree Hybrids

    Fruit Tree Hybrids (5)

    Fruit trees in this category include stone fruits which have been crossed with each other to produce new fruits, including Pluots (plum/apricot cross), and Sugar'n/Spice (nectarine/plum cross)
  • Plum Trees European

    Plum Trees European (16)

    Plum trees in this list are among the sweetest plums in our catalogue, originating in Europe, and include the famous Green Gage plum, and also the many different types of Prune plum trees
  • Peach Trees

    Peach Trees (22)

    Peach trees in our list this year range further and wider than ever before, - white fleshed peaches, yellow fleshed peaches, clingstone peaches, fresh eatering peaches, dwarf peach trees, standard sized peach trees...something for everyone.
  • Nectarine Trees

    Nectarine Trees (14)

    Nectarine trees are offered mostly on standard sized rootstocks this year- and will make 3-4 metre trees in best conditions. Dwarf Nectarine trees are also listed here - Sunny Dwarf Nectarine, and Yellow Dwarf nectarine, and will yield nectarine trees of approximately 1.5 metres high
  • Fig Trees

    Fig Trees (8)

    Fig trees are hardy customers with very good drought tolerance. They really are fruit trees from out of antiquity, up there with the oldest of known fruits still cultivated, known in Biblical times and well before, along with grapes and olives. The fruit from fig trees is either dried or eaten fresh - delicious, but is difficult to get in the market, as it has such a short shelf life, and it is actually at its best when eaten straight from the tree – hence the need to grow your own! It is cooked in breads, desserts and myriad other dishes, (some of the best cooked figs I ever ate were simply cut in half, sprinkled lightly with brown sugar, grilled and then dolloped with mascarpone cream…divine). To overcome their inability to be transported figs have been dried, which they are suited to with their high sugar content. The fruit of fig trees is also used to make a uniquely flavoured jam.
  • Persimmon Trees

    Persimmon Trees (2)

    Persimmon trees are a lovely ornamental specimen fruit tree, often with a semi weeping form, which gives a beautiful display of deep orange autumn leaves, and retains many of its orange coloured fruit after leaf fall, making it the prettiest fruit tree in the winter garden. The botanical word for persimmon trees is ‘diospyros’ meaning ‘food of the gods’, and it’s not far wrong either – the problem with these fruit being that they are often not left to ripen properly before eating, and they are very astringent when unripe. When ripe they are a delicious rich sweet flavour quite unlike any other fruit in the garden. Louis Glowinski suggests flavour is not unlike apricot jam.
  • Mulberry Trees

    Mulberry Trees (8)

    Mulberry trees are an old fashioned tree that used to be grown on many homesteads in earlier times. Yielding delicious black berry like fruit early in Spring, they also make a wonderful shade tree
  • Almond-Trees

    Almond-Trees (4)

    Almond trees are grafted onto peach rootstocks, and yield trees of around 4 metres in best conditions. The Self Pollinating almond is a semi dwarf almond which will make a tree of three metres or less. Almond trees are one of the quickest nut trees to start bearing - sometimes taking only two years to crop
  • Walnut Trees

    Walnut Trees (4)

    Walnut trees produce a well known nut which is eaten fresh, (not too many at a time, as they are very rich), they keep flavour well when cooked and are used in ice-cream, cakes, breads, and sweets - maybe the most famous of which is the Greek Baklava. Walnut trees provide an essential ingredient in the very fine Waldorf salad.
  • Pecan Trees

    Pecan Trees (3)

    Pecan trees are nut trees native to USA, quite large trees, sending down a very deep taproot to find underground water, extremely long lived – some wild trees estimated at over 1000 years old, trees adapt well to most climates. Are less bitter and have more sweetness than the walnut, and can be substituted in most recipes, useful for everything from stews to pies, cakes, fillings, soups, ice cream, candies
  • Chestnut Trees

    Chestnut Trees (5)

    Chestnut trees yield nuts which are nutritionally very similar to potatoes and cereals, high in carbohydrates, low in fats and proteins, can be roasted, baked, boiled, pureed; very good for taking out in the bush and roasting over the campfire, (the smell of cooked chestnuts is very alluring) can be dried and ground into a useful flour, easy to harvest and prepare. Chestnut trees give good quantity of meat per nut. They will bear a modest crop on their own, but Chestnuts give heavier crops with pollination from a different variety of chestnut tree.
  • Sugar Maple Trees

    Sugar Maple Trees (1)

    Sugar Maple trees are tall growing Canadian trees, used to tap the sap for Maple Syrup, (may come into its own once all the bees have become extinct due to colony collapse disorder.) Sugar maple trees will grow best in cooler climates, and deep soils with plenty of moisture, otherwise give plenty of supplementary irrigation, good feature / specimen tree with wonderful autumn colours